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Too many women worldwide – particularly the poorest women – continue to die from cervical cancer; a disease which is both preventable and treatable. Today, WHO and HRP have launched new guidelines to help countries make faster progress, more equitably, on the screening and treatment of this devastating disease.Ending suffering from cervical cancerLast year, in 2020, more than half a million women contracted cervical cancer, and about 342 000 women died as a result – most in the poorest countries. Quick and accurate screening programmes are critical so that every woman with cervical disease gets the treatment she needs, and avoidable deaths are prevented. WHO’s global strategy for cervical cancer elimination – endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2020 –  calls for 70% women globally to be screened regularly for cervical disease with a high-performance test, and for 90% of those needing it to receive appropriate treatment. Alongside vaccination of girls against the human papillomavirus (HPV), implementing this global strategy could prevent more than 62 million deaths from cervical cancer in the next 100 years.“Effective and accessible cervical screening and treatment programmes in every country are non-negotiable if we are going to end the unimaginable suffering caused by cervical cancer,” says Dr Princess Nono Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Strategic Programmatic Priorities: Cervical Cancer Elimination. “These new WHO guidelines will guide public health investment in better diagnostic tools, stronger implementation processes and more acceptable options for screening to reach more women –  and save more lives.”A shift in careThe new guidelines include some important shifts in WHO’s recommended approaches to cervical screening.  Too many women worldwide – particularly the poorest women – continue to die from cervical cancer; a disease which is both preventable and treatable. Today, WHO and HRP have launched new guidelines to help countries make faster progress, more equitably, on the screening and treatment of this devastating disease.Ending suffering from cervical cancerLast year, in 2020, more than half a million women contracted cervical cancer, and about 342 000 women died as a result – most in the poorest countries. Quick and accurate screening programmes are critical so that every woman with cervical disease gets the treatment she needs, and avoidable deaths are prevented. WHO’s global strategy for cervical cancer elimination – endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2020 –  calls for 70% women globally to be screened regularly for cervical disease with a high-performance test, and for 90% of those needing it to receive appropriate treatment. Alongside vaccination of girls against the human papillomavirus (HPV), implementing this global strategy could prevent more than 62 million deaths from cervical cancer in the next 100 years.“Effective and accessible cervical screening and treatment programmes in every country are non-negotiable if we are going to end the unimaginable suffering caused by cervical cancer,” says Dr Princess Nono Simelela, Assistant Director-General for Strategic Programmatic Priorities: Cervical Cancer Elimination. “These new WHO guidelines will guide public health investment in better diagnostic tools, stronger implementation processes and more acceptable options for screening to reach more women –  and save more lives.”A shift in careThe new guidelines include some important shifts in WHO’s recommended approaches to cervical screening. 

New recommendations for screening and treatment to prevent cervical cancer