1. W.H.O. recommends Roche, Sanofi arthritis drugs for COVID-19 to cut death risk | ANC  ANC 24/7
  2. WHO recommends Roche, Sanofi drugs for COVID-19 to cut death risk  CTV News
  3. WHO adds ‘lifesaving’ drugs for severely ill COVID-19 patients  Al Jazeera English
  4. WHO recommends new drugs for COVID-19 treatment  CGTN
  5. Study finds arthritis-treating drugs tocilizumab, sarilumab help reduce COVID-19 deaths  Firstpost
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The World Health Organization has recommended using arthritis drugs Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids for COVID-19 patients after data from some 11,000 patients showed they cut the risk of death.The World Health Organization has recommended using arthritis drugs Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids for COVID-19 patients after data from some 11,000 patients showed they cut the risk of death.

WHO recommends Roche, Sanofi drugs for COVID-19 to cut death risk | CTV News

Interleukin-6 receptor blockers join corticosteroids on list of effective treatments for severe coronavirus.Interleukin-6 receptor blockers join corticosteroids on list of effective treatments for severe coronavirus.

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Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized Covid-19 patients, according to an analysis of nearly 11,000 patients published Tuesday.Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized Covid-19 patients, according to an analysis of nearly 11,000 patients published Tuesday.

Two Arthritis Drugs Reduce Risk Of COVID-19 Death, Shows Study

The World Health Organization (WHO) on Tuesday recommended interleukin-6 receptor blockers for people with severe COVID-19, urging the producers to join efforts to rapidly increase the access to the drugs.

WHO recommends new drugs for COVID-19 treatment - CGTN

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Study finds that tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for mechanical ventilation.Study finds that tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for mechanical ventilation.

WHO advises 2 monoclonal antibodies for severe COVID | CIDRAP

The World Health Organization (WHO) has updated its patient care guidelines to include interleukin-6 receptor blockers, a class of medicines that are lifesaving in patients who are severely or critically ill with COVID-19, especially when administered alongside corticosteroids. These were the findings from a prospective and a living network meta-analysis initiated by WHO, the largest such analysis on the drugs to date. Data from over 10 000 patients enrolled in 27 clinical trials were considered. These are the first drugs found to be effective against COVID-19 since corticosteroids were recommended by WHO in September 2020. Patients severely or critically ill with COVID-19 often suffer from an overreaction of the immune system, which can be very harmful to the patient’s health. Interleukin-6 blocking drugs – tocilizumab and sarilumab – act to suppress this overreaction.  The prospective and living network meta-analyses showed that in severely or critically ill patients, administering these drugs reduce the odds of death by 13%, compared to standard care. This means that there will be 15 fewer deaths per thousand patients, and as many as 28 fewer deaths for every thousand critically ill patients. The odds of mechanical ventilation among severe and critical patients are reduced by 28%, compared with standard care. This translates to 23 fewer patients out of a thousand needing mechanical ventilation. Clinical trial investigators in 28 countries shared data with WHO, including pre-publication data. Researchers worldwide compiled and analyzed the data. With the support of these critical partnerships, WHO has been able to issue a rapid and trustworthy recommendation for the use of interleukin-6 receptor blockers in severe and critical COVID-19 patients.“These drugs offer hope for patients and families who are suffering from the devastating impact of severe and critical COVID-19. But IL-6 receptor blockers remain inaccessible and unaffordable for the majority of the world,” said WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.“The inequitable distribution of vaccines means that people in low- and middle-income countries are most susceptible to severe forms of COVID-19. So, the greatest need for these drugs is in countries that currently have the least access. We must urgently change this.” To increase access and affordability of these life-saving products, WHO calls on manufacturers to reduce prices and make supplies available to low- and middle-income countries, especially where COVID-19 is surging. WHO also encourages companies to agree to transparent, non-exclusive voluntary licensing agreements using the C-TAP platform and the Medicines Patent Pool, or to waive exclusivity rights.In addition, WHO has launched an expression of interest for prequalification of manufacturers of interleukin-6 receptor blockers. Prequalification of innovator and biosimilar products aims to expand the availability of quality-assured products and to increase access through market competition and reduce prices to meet urgent public health needs.The World Health Organization (WHO) has updated its patient care guidelines to include interleukin-6 receptor blockers, a class of medicines that are lifesaving in patients who are severely or critically ill with COVID-19, especially when administered alongside corticosteroids. These were the findings from a prospective and a living network meta-analysis initiated by WHO, the largest such analysis on the drugs to date. Data from over 10 000 patients enrolled in 27 clinical trials were considered. These are the first drugs found to be effective against COVID-19 since corticosteroids were recommended by WHO in September 2020. Patients severely or critically ill with COVID-19 often suffer from an overreaction of the immune system, which can be very harmful to the patient’s health. Interleukin-6 blocking drugs – tocilizumab and sarilumab – act to suppress this overreaction.  The prospective and living network meta-analyses showed that in severely or critically ill patients, administering these drugs reduce the odds of death by 13%, compared to standard care. This means that there will be 15 fewer deaths per thousand patients, and as many as 28 fewer deaths for every thousand critically ill patients. The odds of mechanical ventilation among severe and critical patients are reduced by 28%, compared with standard care. This translates to 23 fewer patients out of a thousand needing mechanical ventilation. Clinical trial investigators in 28 countries shared data with WHO, including pre-publication data. Researchers worldwide compiled and analyzed the data. With the support of these critical partnerships, WHO has been able to issue a rapid and trustworthy recommendation for the use of interleukin-6 receptor blockers in severe and critical COVID-19 patients.“These drugs offer hope for patients and families who are suffering from the devastating impact of severe and critical COVID-19. But IL-6 receptor blockers remain inaccessible and unaffordable for the majority of the world,” said WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.“The inequitable distribution of vaccines means that people in low- and middle-income countries are most susceptible to severe forms of COVID-19. So, the greatest need for these drugs is in countries that currently have the least access. We must urgently change this.” To increase access and affordability of these life-saving products, WHO calls on manufacturers to reduce prices and make supplies available to low- and middle-income countries, especially where COVID-19 is surging. WHO also encourages companies to agree to transparent, non-exclusive voluntary licensing agreements using the C-TAP platform and the Medicines Patent Pool, or to waive exclusivity rights.In addition, WHO has launched an expression of interest for prequalification of manufacturers of interleukin-6 receptor blockers. Prequalification of innovator and biosimilar products aims to expand the availability of quality-assured products and to increase access through market competition and reduce prices to meet urgent public health needs.

WHO recommends life-saving interleukin-6 receptor blockers for COVID-19 and urges producers to join efforts to rapidly increase access

The World Health Organization ((WHO)) has recommended the use of arthritis drugs, Actemra (tocilizumab) from Roche <<RHHBY>> and Kevzara (Sarilumab) from...The World Health Organization ((WHO)) has recommended the use of arthritis drugs, Actemra (tocilizumab) from Roche <<RHHBY>> and Kevzara (Sarilumab) from...

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The World Health Organization on Tuesday (Jul 6) recommended using arthritis drugs Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids ...The World Health Organization on Tuesday (Jul 6) recommended using arthritis drugs Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids ...

WHO recommends Roche, Sanofi's arthritis drugs with corticosteroids for COVID-19 treatment to cut death risk - CNA

Outcomes were better when patients also received corticosteroids with the risk of dying 21 per cent compared to 25 per cent for those receiving usual care. This means that for every 100 such patients, four more will survive, the study said. | World NewsOutcomes were better when patients also received corticosteroids with the risk of dying 21 per cent compared to 25 per cent for those receiving usual care. This means that for every 100 such patients, four more will survive, the study said.

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab lower deaths by Covid-19, says study | World News - Hindustan Times

For every 100 patients given Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids, four more will survive, according to WHO analysis.For every 100 patients given Actemra from Roche and Kevzara from Sanofi with corticosteroids, four more will survive, according to WHO analysis.

WHO recommends 2 arthritis drugs for treatment of COVID-19

Patients severely or critically ill with covid-19 often suffer from an overreaction of the immune system, which can be very harmful to their health. Interleukin-6 blocking drugs – tocilizumab and sarilumab – act to suppress this overreaction.Patients severely or critically ill with covid-19 often suffer from an overreaction of the immune system, which can be very harmful to their health. Interleukin-6 blocking drugs – tocilizumab and sarilumab – act to suppress this overreaction.

WHO recommends tocilizumab, sarilumab for critically ill covid patients

Adding drugs that block immune protein called interleukin-6 to already widely used treatment, corticosteroids, reduces the risk of death and the need for breathing assistance, WHO said.Adding drugs that block immune protein called interleukin-6 to already widely used treatment, corticosteroids, reduces the risk of death and the need for breathing assistance, WHO said.

Anti-inflammatory drugs reduce hospitalisation, deaths from Covid, WHO says

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Doctors Without Borders is urging Roche to lower the price of a drug recommended by the WHO to treat Covid-19.Doctors Without Borders is urging Roche to lower the price of a drug recommended by the WHO to treat Covid-19.

Roche urged to cut price of drug now recommended for Covid-19

The World Health Organization said Tuesday that the powerful rheumatoid arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab can cut the risk of of COVID-19 death when used alongside corticosteroids.The World Health Organization said Tuesday that the powerful rheumatoid arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab can cut the risk of of COVID-19 death when used alongside corticosteroids.

Arthritis drugs Actemra, Kevzara cut COVID death risk: WHO - New York Daily News

A new study prompted the WHO to recommend the use of the medicines, known as IL-6 inhibitors, in addition to corticosteroids among patients with severe or critical COVID-19.A new study prompted the WHO to recommend the use of the medicines, known as IL-6 inhibitors, in addition to corticosteroids among patients with severe or critical COVID-19.

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce COVID-19 deaths: study

The National Institute of Health has been monitoring the presence of different variants in Pakistan.The National Institute of Health has been monitoring the presence of different variants in Pakistan.

NCOC confirms presence of different variants in Pakistan - Pakistan - DAWN.COM

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce Covid deaths: studyArthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce Covid deaths: study

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce Covid deaths: study - France 24

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Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, according to an analysis of nearly 11,000 patients published Tuesday.Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, according to an analysis of nearly 11,000 patients published Tuesday.

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce COVID-19 deaths - study | GMA News Online

Arthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, according to an analysis oArthritis drugs tocilizumab and sarilumab reduce the risk of death and the need for ventilators among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, according to an analysis of nearly 11,000 patients published on Tuesday. The study appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association and prompted the...

Two arthritis drugs reduce COVID deaths, large-scale study indicates