1. Earth Has a 27.5-Million-Year 'Heartbeat', But We Don't Know What Causes It  ScienceAlert
  2. Earth's 'pulse' of geologic activity happens every 27.5 million years, says study  Daily Mail
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In the last 260 million years, dinosaurs came and went, Pangea split into the continents and islands we see today, and humans have quickly and irreversibly changed the world we live in.In the last 260 million years, dinosaurs came and went, Pangea split into the continents and islands we see today, and humans have quickly and irreversibly changed the world we live in.

Earth Has a 27.5-Million-Year 'Heartbeat', But We Don't Know What Causes It

Strangely, global geologic events over the last 260 million years have been grouped in 'pulses' of roughly 27.5 million years apart, say researchers at New York University.Strangely, global geologic events over the last 260 million years have been grouped in 'pulses' of roughly 27.5 million years apart, say researchers at New York University.

Earth's 'pulse' of geologic activity happens every 27.5 million years, says study | Daily Mail Online