John Ivison: More cake anyone? How about another scoop of ice cream?  National PostView Full coverage on Google News
Trudeau is spending like it's his birthday

John Ivison: More cake anyone? How about another scoop of ice cream? | National Post

John Ivison: More cake anyone? How about another scoop of ice cream? | National Post

The federal budget's new digital services tax on large corporations is a step forward as the government works toward a multilateral agreement it hopes to reach with other countries, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Wednesday.The federal budget's new digital services tax on large corporations is a step forward as the government works toward a multilateral agreement it hopes to reach with other countries, Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said Wednesday.

Digital services tax a step forward as OECD works on multilateral deal, Freeland says | CTV News

There is a word that appears in Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s budget speech this week, and it seems oddly out of place.

Glavin: A budget to pay for the Trudeau government's bungling on COVID | Ottawa Citizen

Glavin: A budget to pay for the Trudeau government's bungling on COVID

Glavin: A budget to pay for the Trudeau government's bungling on COVID | Ottawa Citizen

Humanitarian groups in Canada are expressing disappointment with the federal budget presented by the minority Liberal government, saying it is a missed opportunity that limits  Ottawa’s ability to play a “meaningful long-term role” in a post-pandemic global recovery.Humanitarian groups in Canada are expressing disappointment with the federal budget presented by the minority Liberal government, saying it is a missed opportunity that limits  Ottawa’s ability to play a “meaningful long-term role” in a post-pandemic global recovery.

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Quite apart from the unrecoverable human toll, the costs Canadians must bear include about $100 billion in new spending

Terry Glavin: Federal budget's 'sorry' doesn't cut it for Trudeau government's COVID failures | National Post

Terry Glavin: Federal budget's 'sorry' doesn't cut it for Trudeau government's COVID failures | National Post

Gender politics should have no place in a nation's most important document, its federal budget

Rex Murphy: The finance minister needs to exercise her powers equably, for all Canadians | National Post

Rex Murphy: The finance minister needs to exercise her powers equably, for all Canadians | National Post

A political gaffe occurs when a politician accidentally tells the truth.

EDITORIAL: Memo to Freeland -- it's our money | Toronto Sun

EDITORIAL: Memo to Freeland -- it's our money | Toronto Sun

Our government completely let us down the one time we actually needed it to keep us safe

Jesse Kline: Chrystia Freeland's budget tries to paper over failed COVID response | National Post

Jesse Kline: Chrystia Freeland's budget tries to paper over failed COVID response | National Post

‘It is most certainly not a balanced budget’‘It is most certainly not a balanced budget’

Federal budget strangles job growth, says MP Blaine Calkins – Red Deer Advocate

MP says budget illustrates that Liberals don’t have a plan to recover from COVID-19 lossesMP says budget illustrates that Liberals don’t have a plan to recover from COVID-19 losses

Chilliwack Hope MP Strahl says federal budget doesn’t reflect needs of Canadians – Chilliwack Progress

He is wagering that the economy will grow fast enough, and interest rates remain low enough, long enough for the government to meet the added costs of its…

Kelly McParland: Justin Trudeau's big budget gamble | National Post

Kelly McParland: Justin Trudeau's big budget gamble | National Post

In the first budget in over two years, the Liberals laid out their vision for a post-COVID Canada -- and dropped some hints about when a post-COVID Canada could become reality.In the first budget in over two years, the Liberals laid out their vision for a post-COVID Canada -- and dropped some hints about when a post-COVID Canada could become reality.

Post-COVID-19 Canada: What the federal budget tells us about the end of the pandemic - National | Globalnews.ca

Serves as an excellent summary of the Trudeau government — it excels at posturing but is weak on delivering results

Philip Cross: Budget rains down oceans of red ink but may not be as transformative as it seems | Financial Post

Philip Cross: Budget rains down oceans of red ink but may not be as transformative as it seems | Financial Post

OTTAWA — Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland sent a warning to provinces about her budget's pledge on child care, saying she would negotiate in good faith but not bend on reducing parental fees, as several provinces questioned the tight strings on the promised new spending. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau backed up that warning Tuesday with one of his own: provinces must agree to required targets on affordability, quality of care and training of...

Freeland says Liberals open to provincial child care demands, draws line around fees

The Liberals have offered a feminist budget, say observers, with measures that help women struggling amid COVID-19 in the short term, like rent and wage subsidy extensions.The Liberals have offered a feminist budget, say observers, with measures that help women struggling amid COVID-19 in the short term, like rent and wage subsidy extensions.

‘Breathtaking’ childcare pledge to pay dividends beyond recouping pandemic losses: labour experts - The Hill Times

Homeowners fearing sweeping measures that could have over-corrected the housing market likely breathed a sigh of relief on Monday after hearing the details of the federal budget. Despite growing calls from numerous bank analysts in recent weeks for the need to tax the sale of principal residences, in some form or another, the government left the primary residence capital gains exemption untouched. One key housing measure introduced in Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland's first budget was a 1% vacant property tax

Federal Budget Doesn't Rock the Canadian Housing Boat - Mortgage Rates & Mortgage Broker News in Canada

Liberal Party of Canada said $15 federal minimum wage was a ‘bad policy’

Liberal Party Ran Attack Ads Against Minimum Wage Increase Before Including It in 2021 Liberal Budget

Jagmeet Singh: 'Clearly irresponsible to trigger an election while we're in the midst of this third wave'

Budget criticism but no election calls, though O'Toole seeks change on economic growth | National Post

Budget criticism but no election calls, though O'Toole seeks change on economic growth | National Post

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insists Monday's federal budget is not intended as a launching pad for an election later this year but he's not entirely ruling one out.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insists Monday's federal budget is not intended as a launching pad for an election later this year but he's not entirely ruling one out.

Trudeau says Liberal budget is not a launch pad for a federal election - Canada News - Castanet.net

OTTAWA – Federal opposition leaders are criticizing the Liberal government’s first budget in two years for omitting pharmacare and failing to provide a bigger boost to old age security or provincial health-care transfers. Debate began in the House of Commons today with leaders pushing to shape the economic blueprint more to their liking. Federal NDP

Opposition leaders criticize federal budget over pharmacare, old age security, - Medicine Hat NewsMedicine Hat News

From Canada's proposals on a national daycare program to introducing a new digital services tax, financial expert Preet Banerjee takes a closer look at the 2021 federal budget.From Canada's proposals on a national daycare program to introducing a new digital services tax, financial expert Preet Banerjee takes a closer look at the 2021 federal budget.

Canada’s federal budget: A financial expert breaks it down - National | Globalnews.ca

From housing to wildfire preparedness, here’s a breakdown of highlights for NWT residents in the proposed 2021 federal budget.From housing to wildfire preparedness, here’s a breakdown of highlights for NWT residents in the proposed 2021 federal budget.

What does the NWT get from Canada’s latest budget?

Budget sets Canada on a path to fiscal danger, with its plunge into permanent, unfunded spending increases and structural deficits

Opinion: Federal budget: Spend. Spend more. Then spend more than that | Financial Post

Opinion: Federal budget: Spend. Spend more. Then spend more than that | Financial Post

“Mr. Speaker, I rise today to table the 2021-22 budget of the Government of Canada. The real one.

KINSELLA: The budget speech Chrystia Freeland didn't deliver | Toronto Sun

KINSELLA: The budget speech Chrystia Freeland didn't deliver

KINSELLA: The budget speech Chrystia Freeland didn't deliver | Toronto Sun

National Post readers sound off on the issues of the day including the federal budget, calls to suspend flights to and from India, and why the MPs who shared…

Letters to the editor: Budget 2021: 'As fiscally responsible Canadians, we have lost our minds' | National Post

Letters to the editor: Budget 2021: 'As fiscally responsible Canadians, we have lost our minds' | National Post

Ideological commitments in Ottawa’s latest spendapalooza should be chewed on hard, not bolted down untasted

John Robson: Trudeau Liberals believe there's a free lunch, but don't swallow it | National Post

John Robson: Trudeau Liberals believe there's a free lunch, but don't swallow it | National Post

Ottawa announced a new federal foreign buyers tax in the first federal budget in two years, but experts say it won’t help make housing more affordable.Ottawa announced a new federal foreign buyers tax in the first federal budget in two years, but experts say it won’t help make housing more affordable.

Why Canada's new foreign buyers tax won't fix skyrocketing home prices

Eventually, someone has to pay for all of this spending

Corbella: Trudeau's reckless budget burdens the kids he claims he's helping | Calgary Herald

Corbella: Trudeau's reckless budget burdens the kids he claims he's helping | Calgary Herald

He may very well succeed.

Bell: Trudeau tries to buy four more years in power, it could work | Calgary Sun

Bell: Trudeau tries to buy four more years in power, it could work

Bell: Trudeau tries to buy four more years in power, it could work | Calgary Sun

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Changes to Canada's elections act. New rules for judges' pensions. Retroactive authorization for First Nations to postpone elections during the pandemic. New powers for the immigration minister to issue instructions on express entry for permanent resident applicants. None of them have much, if anything, to do with government spending or the economy. However, they are among several non-budgetary measures included in the 739-page budget tabled by Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland in the House of Commons Monday. Officials say some of the measures outlined in the budget may be included in the upcoming budget implementation bill. Others, however, may be presented to Parliament as part of separate bills. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government is not the first to quietly include non-monetary measures in a budget or a budget implementation bill instead of separate, standalone legislation. It was a hallmark of former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper's government. For example, in 2015, the Harper government included a provision in a budget bill that retroactively rewrote Canada's access to information law to protect the RCMP from being charged by the Information Commissioner for destroying gun registry documents before legislation to scrap the gun registry was adopted by Parliament. The Liberal Party's 2015 campaign platform sharply criticized the practice, saying Harper's government had "used omnibus bills to prevent Parliament from properly reviewing and debating" proposals. "We will change the House of Commons standing orders to bring an end to this undemocratic practice," Trudeau's Liberals vowed. WATCH | Chrystia Freeland delivers federal budget Conservative Ethics Critic Michael Barrett said this budget wouldn't be the only time the Trudeau government has included non-monetary measures in a budget. "The Trudeau government has been known to use the budget to benefit Liberal insiders, like the time they buried a deferred prosecution agreement for SNC Lavalin in Budget 2018," he wrote. "Given the Liberal's past actions we will be reviewing the legislation very closely." Here are some of the non-budgetary measures contained in the Trudeau government's omnibus budget. Elections Act On Feb. 19, Ontario Superior Court Justice Breese Davies struck down a key section of Canada's elections law designed to curb misinformation during elections, saying it was an unjustifiable restriction on the right of Canadians to free speech. In March, the government decided not to appeal the ruling and said it would study how to ensure that deliberate false statements are covered under the election law. The government included plans to act in its budget on Monday. "Budget 2021 proposes to introduce amendments to the Canada Elections Act to specify that making or publishing a false statement in relation to a candidate, prospective candidate, or party leader would be an offence only if the person or entity knows that the statement is false." Judges In February, Quebec Superior Court Justice Michel Girouard resigned shortly before Justice Minister David Lametti was poised to ask Parliament to remove him from office. But while Girouard's resignation put an end to an eight-year legal battle to keep his job that the Canadian Judicial Council estimates cost Canadian taxpayers millions of dollars, it left Girouard with a lucrative federal pension. "Throughout this entire period, Michel Girouard has continued to receive his full salary despite not sitting, and he will now receive a pension for life, all at the expense of Canadian taxpayers," Justice Richard Wagner, chairperson of the council, wrote in February as he called for reforms to the process that reviews the conduct of judges. Girouard, named to the bench in 2010, has been collecting a $329,900 annual salary and building up pension credits but hasn't heard any cases since January 2013, following an allegation that he bought illegal drugs from a client. In the wake of former Justice Michel Girouard's eight-year fight to keep his job, provisions were included in the budget to allow a judge's pension benefits to be frozen.(Radio-Canada) While that allegation wasn't proven, in February 2018 the Canadian Judicial Council found that Girouard "attempted to mislead and conceal the truth during the process of review of allegations against him," and recommended that he be removed from the bench. Girouard qualified for early retirement and pension on Sept. 30, 2020 as he was fighting his removal. However, a passage in Monday's budget could stop that from happening again. "Budget 2021 proposes to amend the Judges Act to freeze a judge's pension entitlements, as of the date the Canadian Judicial Council recommends a judge's removal from office." Justice department officials say the change is unlikely to apply retroactively to Girouard. Charities and terrorists The government is proposing measures to crack down on charities it believes are affiliated with terrorist organizations. Currently, when a group is listed as a terrorist entity, its charitable status can be revoked but only after an administrative process. If that process recommends its charitable status be revoked, the group can appeal that decision in court. The budget, however, proposes to give the minister of national revenue the power to immediately revoke the registration of a charity. The provision does not mention any right of appeal. The government is also proposing to add someone who has been a member of a terrorist entity to the category of "ineligible individuals" involved with a charity. If a charity has an "ineligible individual" on its board or among its officers the Minister of National Revenue can refuse or revoke the charity's registration or suspend its right to issue official donation receipts. The budget also proposes allowing the minister to suspend a charity's authority to issue official receipts for a year or revoke its registration if it makes a false statement to maintain its registration as a charity. All of the measures would take effect upon royal assent of the bill. First Nations elections When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in spring 2020, the Trudeau government adopted regulations to allow First Nations to cancel or postpone elections that were due to take place during the pandemic. Since then, 116 First Nations have used the First Nations Election Cancellation and Postponement Regulations to postpone elections. Earlier this month, Federal Court Justice Sébastien Grammond sided with a challenge launched by a member of the Acho Dene Koe First Nation in the Northwest Territories and struck down a section of the regulations that dealt with elections held according to custom. Grammond ruled that the federal government had overstepped its powers under the Indian Act and the Acho Dene Koe First Nation did not have the power to extend its own term of office. Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller has said the regulations are "a key tool" in managing COVID-19 risks in First Nations and the government will appeal the ruling. Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller has vowed to appeal a ruling striking down regulations that allowed postponement of First Nations elections during the pandemic. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press) Meanwhile, Monday's budget includes plans to retroactively validate the postponement of elections over the past year. "The government proposes to introduce legislation that would ensure that the First Nations Election Cancellation and Postponement Regulations (Prevention of Diseases) are deemed to have been validly made since April 7, 2020." Immigration According to the budget, Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino is about to get new powers to choose who gets faster track entry into Canada. "The Government of Canada intends to propose amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to provide the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada with authority to use ministerial instructions to help select those candidates who best meet Canada's labour market needs from among the growing pool of candidates who wish to become permanent residents through the Express Entry System." The budget says Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino will get the power to issue ministerial instructions on express entry of permanent resident applicants.(Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press) It comes only a few days after the government announced a plan to help health-care professionals and essential workers already in Canada get permanent status in Canada. Elizabeth Thompson can be reached at elizabeth.thompson@cbc.caChanges to Canada's elections act. New rules for judges' pensions. Retroactive authorization for First Nations to postpone elections during the pandemic. New powers for the immigration minister to issue instructions on express entry for permanent resident applicants. None of them have much, if anything, to do with government spending or the economy. However, they are among several non-budgetary measures included in the 739-page budget tabled by Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland in the House of Commons Monday. Officials say some of the measures outlined in the budget may be included in the upcoming budget implementation bill. Others, however, may be presented to Parliament as part of separate bills. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government is not the first to quietly include non-monetary measures in a budget or a budget implementation bill instead of separate, standalone legislation. It was a hallmark of former Conservative prime minister Stephen Harper's government. For example, in 2015, the Harper government included a provision in a budget bill that retroactively rewrote Canada's access to information law to protect the RCMP from being charged by the Information Commissioner for destroying gun registry documents before legislation to scrap the gun registry was adopted by Parliament. The Liberal Party's 2015 campaign platform sharply criticized the practice, saying Harper's government had "used omnibus bills to prevent Parliament from properly reviewing and debating" proposals. "We will change the House of Commons standing orders to bring an end to this undemocratic practice," Trudeau's Liberals vowed. WATCH | Chrystia Freeland delivers federal budget Conservative Ethics Critic Michael Barrett said this budget wouldn't be the only time the Trudeau government has included non-monetary measures in a budget. "The Trudeau government has been known to use the budget to benefit Liberal insiders, like the time they buried a deferred prosecution agreement for SNC Lavalin in Budget 2018," he wrote. "Given the Liberal's past actions we will be reviewing the legislation very closely." Here are some of the non-budgetary measures contained in the Trudeau government's omnibus budget. Elections Act On Feb. 19, Ontario Superior Court Justice Breese Davies struck down a key section of Canada's elections law designed to curb misinformation during elections, saying it was an unjustifiable restriction on the right of Canadians to free speech. In March, the government decided not to appeal the ruling and said it would study how to ensure that deliberate false statements are covered under the election law. The government included plans to act in its budget on Monday. "Budget 2021 proposes to introduce amendments to the Canada Elections Act to specify that making or publishing a false statement in relation to a candidate, prospective candidate, or party leader would be an offence only if the person or entity knows that the statement is false." Judges In February, Quebec Superior Court Justice Michel Girouard resigned shortly before Justice Minister David Lametti was poised to ask Parliament to remove him from office. But while Girouard's resignation put an end to an eight-year legal battle to keep his job that the Canadian Judicial Council estimates cost Canadian taxpayers millions of dollars, it left Girouard with a lucrative federal pension. "Throughout this entire period, Michel Girouard has continued to receive his full salary despite not sitting, and he will now receive a pension for life, all at the expense of Canadian taxpayers," Justice Richard Wagner, chairperson of the council, wrote in February as he called for reforms to the process that reviews the conduct of judges. Girouard, named to the bench in 2010, has been collecting a $329,900 annual salary and building up pension credits but hasn't heard any cases since January 2013, following an allegation that he bought illegal drugs from a client. In the wake of former Justice Michel Girouard's eight-year fight to keep his job, provisions were included in the budget to allow a judge's pension benefits to be frozen.(Radio-Canada) While that allegation wasn't proven, in February 2018 the Canadian Judicial Council found that Girouard "attempted to mislead and conceal the truth during the process of review of allegations against him," and recommended that he be removed from the bench. Girouard qualified for early retirement and pension on Sept. 30, 2020 as he was fighting his removal. However, a passage in Monday's budget could stop that from happening again. "Budget 2021 proposes to amend the Judges Act to freeze a judge's pension entitlements, as of the date the Canadian Judicial Council recommends a judge's removal from office." Justice department officials say the change is unlikely to apply retroactively to Girouard. Charities and terrorists The government is proposing measures to crack down on charities it believes are affiliated with terrorist organizations. Currently, when a group is listed as a terrorist entity, its charitable status can be revoked but only after an administrative process. If that process recommends its charitable status be revoked, the group can appeal that decision in court. The budget, however, proposes to give the minister of national revenue the power to immediately revoke the registration of a charity. The provision does not mention any right of appeal. The government is also proposing to add someone who has been a member of a terrorist entity to the category of "ineligible individuals" involved with a charity. If a charity has an "ineligible individual" on its board or among its officers the Minister of National Revenue can refuse or revoke the charity's registration or suspend its right to issue official donation receipts. The budget also proposes allowing the minister to suspend a charity's authority to issue official receipts for a year or revoke its registration if it makes a false statement to maintain its registration as a charity. All of the measures would take effect upon royal assent of the bill. First Nations elections When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in spring 2020, the Trudeau government adopted regulations to allow First Nations to cancel or postpone elections that were due to take place during the pandemic. Since then, 116 First Nations have used the First Nations Election Cancellation and Postponement Regulations to postpone elections. Earlier this month, Federal Court Justice Sébastien Grammond sided with a challenge launched by a member of the Acho Dene Koe First Nation in the Northwest Territories and struck down a section of the regulations that dealt with elections held according to custom. Grammond ruled that the federal government had overstepped its powers under the Indian Act and the Acho Dene Koe First Nation did not have the power to extend its own term of office. Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller has said the regulations are "a key tool" in managing COVID-19 risks in First Nations and the government will appeal the ruling. Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller has vowed to appeal a ruling striking down regulations that allowed postponement of First Nations elections during the pandemic. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press) Meanwhile, Monday's budget includes plans to retroactively validate the postponement of elections over the past year. "The government proposes to introduce legislation that would ensure that the First Nations Election Cancellation and Postponement Regulations (Prevention of Diseases) are deemed to have been validly made since April 7, 2020." Immigration According to the budget, Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino is about to get new powers to choose who gets faster track entry into Canada. "The Government of Canada intends to propose amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to provide the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada with authority to use ministerial instructions to help select those candidates who best meet Canada's labour market needs from among the growing pool of candidates who wish to become permanent residents through the Express Entry System." The budget says Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino will get the power to issue ministerial instructions on express entry of permanent resident applicants.(Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press) It comes only a few days after the government announced a plan to help health-care professionals and essential workers already in Canada get permanent status in Canada. Elizabeth Thompson can be reached at elizabeth.thompson@cbc.ca

5 things in the Trudeau government's budget that have nothing to do with spending

Your Local News Network serving London, Windsor, Chatham, Sarnia and Midwestern OntarioThe centrepiece of the first federal budget in two years is the battle against COVID-19.

BlackburnNews.com - Child care, fight against COVID-19 covered by federal budget

Ottawa is unveiling several new taxes ranging from boats to cigarettes while also closing loopholes aimed at recovering evasive taxpayers in its first full fiscal plan since before COVID-19 hit.

'Congratulations!': From luxury cars to smokes – Feds layer on taxes in latest budget - BNN Bloomberg

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