Russia is considering leaving the ISS for its own space station  Yahoo Canada Shine OnView Full coverage on Google News
Russia's space agency Roscosmos has reportedly started work on its own orbiting space station as it considers leaving the ISS by 2025.Russia's space agency Roscosmos has reportedly started work on its own orbiting space station as it considers leaving the ISS by 2025.

Russia is considering leaving the ISS for its own space station

Dmitry Rogozin, chief of the Russian space agency, said work had already begun on the first module of a new station, expected to go into orbit early in 2025.Dmitry Rogozin, chief of the Russian space agency, said work had already begun on the first module of a new station, expected to go into orbit early in 2025.

Russia reveals ambitious plans to launch its own space station in 2025 | Daily Mail Online

The six-month stint on the ISS was marked by scientific experiments and crossovers with other astronaut crews.The six-month stint on the ISS was marked by scientific experiments and crossovers with other astronaut crews.

Watch: Russian Cosmonauts and NASA Astronaut Land After ISS Visit

Russia says to launch own space station in 2025Russia says to launch own space station in 2025

Russia says to launch own space station in 2025 - France 24

According to Yuri Borisov, the new Russian space station could be located higher than the International Space Station and this meant that it would be high orbitalAccording to Yuri Borisov, the new Russian space station could be located higher than the International Space Station and this meant that it would be high orbital

Russia is capable of building orbital station on its own, deputy prime minister says - Science & Space - TASS

Russia is capable of building orbital station on its own, deputy prime minister says

Russia will withdraw from the International Space Station (ISS) after reaching its planned lifespan in 2024 and is working on a new station to replace it, Russian media reported on Sunday.

Russia's cooperation with China on upcoming space station looks promising despite decision to build its own: experts - Global Times

Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin said work had begun on the fist module of a new station, after officials warned that Russia was considering pulling out of the ISS, one of the few successful examples of cooperation with the West.Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin said work had begun on the fist module of a new station, after officials warned that Russia was considering pulling out of the ISS, one of the few successful examples of cooperation with the West.

Russia to withdraw from ISS, will launch own space station - Science & Tech - The Jakarta Post

Russia may quit the ISS project gradually but there is no talk about dumping the orbital outpost in 2025, Roscosmos CEO Dmitry Rogozin said Russia may quit the ISS project gradually but there is no talk about dumping the orbital outpost in 2025, Roscosmos CEO Dmitry Rogozin said

First module for Russia’s new orbital station to be ready in 2025 - Science & Space - TASS

First module for Russia’s new orbital station to be ready in 2025

Russia may soon be abandoning the aging International Space Station — and focus on launching and populating its own space station instead.Russia may soon be abandoning the aging International Space Station — and focus on launching and populating its own space station instead.

Russia Is Reportedly Abandoning the International Space Station

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MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Russia is ready to involve other countries in the project to create a new space station, but is ready to finance it on its own, Deputy Prime Minister...MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Russia is ready to involve other countries in the project to create a new space station, but is ready to finance it on its own, Deputy Prime Minister...

Russia Ready to Attract Foreign Partners to Project of New Space Station, Deputy Prime Minister Says - Sputnik International

Russia’s space agency reportedly plans to deploy its own orbiting outpost after international agreements on the use of ISS expire in 2024.Russia’s space agency reportedly plans to deploy its own orbiting outpost after international agreements on the use of ISS expire in 2024.

Russia to Quit Int’l Space Station in 2025 – Reports - The Moscow Times

MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The first module of Russia's new space station will be ready for launch in 2025, this will be the Science Power Module, originally intended for the...MOSCOW (Sputnik) - The first module of Russia's new space station will be ready for launch in 2025, this will be the Science Power Module, originally intended for the...

First Module of Russia's New Space Station to Be Ready for Launch in 2025, Roscosmos Announces - Sputnik International

1st module of new Russian space station expected to be ready by 2025 - Anadolu Agency1st module of new Russian space station expected to be ready by 2025 - Anadolu Agency

Russia starts building its own space station

The International Space Station has its name for a reason. The orbiting laboratory has hosted astronauts from all over the globe during its many years in operation. As new hardware has been installed on the spacecraft, its capabilities have grown, and a great deal of science is carried out there. Over the years, the two main partners that keep the space station going are the United States (NASA) and Russia (Roscosmos). Now, one of those partners is weighing the heavy decision to back out. Hint: It's not NASA. As Russia's TASS news agency reports, Russian officials have decided that it's time for the country to decide on a pull-out of the International Space Station. The decision will reportedly be made after a technical inspection and survey of the spacecraft itself, some number crunching, and a risk assessment. Simply put, Russia no longer believes the space station is suitable for long-term research efforts, and as of 2025, it may no longer feel comfortable sending its scientists there. There seems to be at least a little bit of information getting lost in translation from the original Russian reports and what is being reported on some news sites. Some outlets are saying that Russia has already decided on leaving the station while others quote Russian officials as saying that they're still weighing the decision. Whatever the case, it's clear that Russia is no longer "all in" on the ISS and it blames that feeling on the technical status of the spacecraft itself. Russia has conducted risk assessments for the spacecraft in the recent past and some of the country's top specialists have predicted the "failure of numerous elements on board the ISS" after the year 2025. The country has already agreed to cooperate with NASA and its other partners on the ISS project through at least 2024, at which point it may decide that enough is enough. A statement from Roscosmos doesn't offer much assurance either way: “We have 2024 as an agreed time limit with our partners on the work of the ISS. After that, decisions will be made based on the technical condition of the station’s modules, which have mostly worn out their service life, as well as our plans to deploy a next-generation national orbital service station." It would be interesting to see what NASA would do if their main ISS partner decides to back out of the program in 2025. The spacecraft has spent over two decades in space, gradually growing as NASA and Russia expanded it, added more scientific equipment, and tested various modules for usability. Many new discoveries have been made during its time in space, but nobody would argue that it's the most modern machine orbiting Earth. Leaks have popped up repeatedly, especially on the Russian side of the spacecraft. Eventually, it'll need to be totally replaced, but nobody really knows when that will happen. For the time being, it's still the go-to for scientists needing to work in microgravity.The International Space Station has its name for a reason. The orbiting laboratory has hosted astronauts from all over the globe during its many years in operation. As new hardware has been installed on the spacecraft, its capabilities have grown, and a great deal of science is carried out there. Over the years, the two main partners that keep the space station going are the United States (NASA) and Russia (Roscosmos). Now, one of those partners is weighing the heavy decision to back out. Hint: It's not NASA. As Russia's TASS news agency reports, Russian officials have decided that it's time for the country to decide on a pull-out of the International Space Station. The decision will reportedly be made after a technical inspection and survey of the spacecraft itself, some number crunching, and a risk assessment. Simply put, Russia no longer believes the space station is suitable for long-term research efforts, and as of 2025, it may no longer feel comfortable sending its scientists there. There seems to be at least a little bit of information getting lost in translation from the original Russian reports and what is being reported on some news sites. Some outlets are saying that Russia has already decided on leaving the station while others quote Russian officials as saying that they're still weighing the decision. Whatever the case, it's clear that Russia is no longer "all in" on the ISS and it blames that feeling on the technical status of the spacecraft itself. Russia has conducted risk assessments for the spacecraft in the recent past and some of the country's top specialists have predicted the "failure of numerous elements on board the ISS" after the year 2025. The country has already agreed to cooperate with NASA and its other partners on the ISS project through at least 2024, at which point it may decide that enough is enough. A statement from Roscosmos doesn't offer much assurance either way: “We have 2024 as an agreed time limit with our partners on the work of the ISS. After that, decisions will be made based on the technical condition of the station’s modules, which have mostly worn out their service life, as well as our plans to deploy a next-generation national orbital service station." It would be interesting to see what NASA would do if their main ISS partner decides to back out of the program in 2025. The spacecraft has spent over two decades in space, gradually growing as NASA and Russia expanded it, added more scientific equipment, and tested various modules for usability. Many new discoveries have been made during its time in space, but nobody would argue that it's the most modern machine orbiting Earth. Leaks have popped up repeatedly, especially on the Russian side of the spacecraft. Eventually, it'll need to be totally replaced, but nobody really knows when that will happen. For the time being, it's still the go-to for scientists needing to work in microgravity.

Russia to decide whether to quit the International Space Station

While the ISS orbits Earth every 90 minutes, experts say it will be particularly bright over the next few nights in most locations across Australia.While the ISS orbits Earth every 90 minutes, experts say it will be particularly bright over the next few nights in most locations across Australia.

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MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Russia's only current female cosmonaut Anna Kikina will head to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2022, a space industry source told Sputnik.MOSCOW (Sputnik) - Russia's only current female cosmonaut Anna Kikina will head to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2022, a space industry source told Sputnik.

Only Female Cosmonaut in Russia’s Team Set to Go to ISS Next Year, Source Says - Sputnik International

PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKY, Russia (Sputnik) - Russia will exit the International Space Station (ISS) initiative in 2025 and will inform its international partners about...PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKY, Russia (Sputnik) - Russia will exit the International Space Station (ISS) initiative in 2025 and will inform its international partners about...

Russia Plans to Withdraw From ISS, Deploy Its Own National Space Station - Sputnik International

Russia to decide on ISS withdrawal from 2025 - CGTN

The spacecraft undocked from the International Space Station (ISS) at approximately 04:34 Moscow timeThe spacecraft undocked from the International Space Station (ISS) at approximately 04:34 Moscow time

Engines of Russia’s Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft fire for deorbit burn - Science & Space - TASS

Engines of Russia’s Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft fire for deorbit burn

Russia will end its participation in the International Space Station after it reaches the end of its planned lifespan in 2024, a senior official has confirmed. Moscow is already working on a new station to replace the current one.Russia will end its participation in the International Space Station after it reaches the end of its planned lifespan in 2024, a senior official has confirmed. Moscow is already working on a new station to replace the current one.

Russia to withdraw from International Space Station starting from 2025, deputy PM confirms, as Moscow works on replacement — RT Russia & Former Soviet Union

We just have one planet. We may advance our know-how and dream of moving en-masse to other planets but no planet in the universe will nurture us like Mother Earth. And it is because of this, images of Earth taken from space have a special place. Sure, we'll have plenty of stars, planets and galaxies to click. But images of our blue planet will always be cherished. NASA has posted new images of Earth. These new images have been captured from International Space Station (ISS). NASA has posted these images from their Instagram account.We just have one planet. We may advance our know-how and dream of moving en-masse to other planets but no planet in the universe will nurture us like Mother Earth. And it is because of this, images of Earth taken from space have a special place. Sure, we'll have plenty of stars, planets and galaxies to click. But images of our blue planet will always be cherished. NASA has posted new images of Earth. These new images have been captured from International Space Station (ISS). NASA has posted these images from their Instagram account.

NASA posts stunning new photos of Earth captured from International Space Station, Science News | wionews.com

'No matter whether we are on land or in space, we are unified by this tiny blue planet,' NASA captioned the post.'No matter whether we are on land or in space, we are unified by this tiny blue planet,' NASA captioned the post.

NASA Shares Photos of What Earth Looks Like From the International Space Station - Photogallery