1. Should all seniors get the COVID-19 vaccine before essential workers?  Global News
  2. UK pushes ambitious COVID-19 vaccine plan  Al Jazeera English
  3. Amanda Kloots refuses to listen to vaccine shamers after receiving COVID-19 Pfizer shot  Daily Mail
  4. View Full coverage on Google News
The Talk star Amanda Kloots gave a new meaning to sportswear in the cutest pleated skirt and matching sweaterThe Talk star Amanda Kloots gave a new meaning to sportswear in the cutest pleated skirt and matching sweater.

The Talk's Amanda Kloots displays endless legs in flirty sportswear | HELLO!

(Shutterstock / Bernardo Emanuell - image credit) As a public health nurse, Stephanie Pizzey knows better than most how COVID-19 vaccines work and how they were developed, and encourages people to take them when offered. But Pizzey, who is 26 weeks pregnant, isn't getting immunized yet on the advice of her doctor. "Initially, I was quite comfortable with getting it because I work a lot with vaccines," said Pizzey. "With this one — it's a little tricky because it hasn't been researched thoroughly in pregnancy or breastfeeding women." Clinical trials for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna — the two types of vaccine available to Canadians — didn't include pregnant or breastfeeding people. While the vaccine was approved for use in other adults, there's not yet conclusive research about the safety and efficacy of the vaccines for either the mother or fetus. Pfizer announced this month that it has started a global clinical trial to test the vaccine for pregnant people, and a dozen women who got the vaccine during its wider trial and later got pregnant are being monitored, with no adverse effects reported so far. But simply opting to wait for research conclusions poses a dilemma for health-care workers like Pizzey. Red Deer registered nurse Stephanie Pizzey is 26 weeks pregnant. Evidence collected in Canada and internationally shows that pregnant people who get COVID-19 are at greater risk of more severe outcomes from the illness. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada recommends pregnant and breastfeeding women be offered the vaccine, as long as no contraindications exist. "This decision is based on the women's personal values and an understanding that the risk of infection and/or morbidity from COVID-19 outweighs the theorized and undescribed risk of being vaccinated during pregnancy or while breastfeeding," the society's statement reads. It remains unclear when vaccine will be made widely available to Albertans. But for now, pregnant health-care workers have to weigh the risks and make their own decisions. In addition to her job with public health, Pizzey sometimes works in the Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre's neonatal intensive care unit. She said if she spent more time in the hospital or working in a setting with a higher likelihood of COVID-19 positive cases, she would likely get the shots. "It's still something that does weigh heavily on my mind," she said, adding that she's open to changing her mind if her doctor's advice changes, or if the obstetrician she is scheduled to meet with soon thinks she should get it now. 'Don't have to rely on other people' Calgary recreation therapist Emily Chell is at the beginning of the third trimester of her pregnancy and plans to get the vaccine. She works on a neuro-rehabilitation unit in a Calgary hospital, with patients who have suffered strokes, and brain and spinal cord injuries. She said she didn't think she would be allowed to get the vaccine until an email inviting her to sign up landed in her inbox in January. She spoke to a friend who is a gynecological surgeon in another province who told her it was her choice. "I was excited, I was stoked," she said. "I waited and talked to my doctor, and she basically backed that up. She said . . . 'if you want to get it, get it.'" Calgary hospital-based recreation therapist Emily Chell is in the third trimester of her pregnancy.She said she researched mRna vaccines, and that made her feel more comfortable. "So for me, the risk sounds very low. The more I looked into it, the more I read about it, the less anxious I was, for sure." Chell has had a couple instances of close contacts to positive COVID-19 cases at work. Though she feels safe at work using PPE, physical distancing and other safety measures, she said, the biggest motivator for her was being able to take some control over protection against the virus. "Knowing that I can get the shot myself and protect myself, and don't have to rely on other people was huge," she said. Chell's appointment was cancelled when the province ran short on its supply of doses, and she hasn't been able to get another appointment booked yet. A shared discussion Pregnant people should weigh the likelihood of being exposed to COVID-19 and talk to their doctors, said Dr. Sue Chandra, a maternal fetal specialist and associate professor at University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine. "In the end it always comes down to the patient's autonomy," said Chandra, who sees patients at the Lois Hole Hospital for Women in Edmonton. "Our job as providers is to give them the best information so they can use that to guide their decision-making," Dr. Sue Chandra is a maternal fetal specialist at the Lois Hole Hospital for Women and an associate professor at University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine. She said the initial exclusion of pregnant and breastfeeding people from clinical trials — a longstanding concern in health research — puts practitioners in a challenging position. "One of the considerations and challenges for us as prenatal providers is that we can't necessarily support the fact that administering this vaccine has been safe for pregnant women or even effective in terms of how much immunity it will convey compared to the effectiveness of the people in the trials," she said. But Chandra said that while most pregnant people won't suffer from severe outcomes if they get COVID-19, they are at a higher risk for ending up in hospital or in intensive care than other people of the same age. She said observation during the pandemic has shown that pregnant people who are over 35, overweight, or who have underlying health conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes or pre-existing heart and lung problems are more at risk of severe outcomes. As for risk to a fetus, Chandra said current information indicates the risk of a COVID-19 positive mother transmitting the virus to the baby is very low, and so far there is no evidence of a correlation with birth defects. However, she said COVID-19 does seem to increase the risk obstetrical complications, including increased risk of pre-term births and potential fetal growth restriction. She said factors a pregnant person should consider as they weigh their decision on getting vaccinated include: Rates of COVID-19 infection in their community; Their personal likelihood of exposure (Do they work from home? With the public? In health care?); And other risk factors for pregnant people, including age, weight and underlying health conditions. Chandra said it should be a shared discussion between a pregnant person their health-care provider. Canadian research into COVID-19 and pregnancy As of Feb. 17, Alberta had reported 898 cases of COVID-19 in pregnant women, according to the Canadian COVID-19 In Pregnancy Surveillance (CANCOVID-Preg), an ongoing initiative led by University of British Columbia researcher Dr. Deborah Money. In a report compiling information from five provinces, the researchers made "crude" calculations of the rate at which pregnant people had contracted COVID-19, and as of Nov. 30, 2020, Alberta had reported the highest rate of COVID-19 infections per 1,000 pregnant individuals: 10.8 - Alberta 6.4 - British Columbia 6.4 Manitoba 6 - Ontario 9.1 - Quebec However, a spokesperson for the program noted that underreporting of COVID-19 among pregnant people in other provinces could be behind a seemingly increased infection rate in Alberta. She said updated data will be released in the next several days.(Shutterstock / Bernardo Emanuell - image credit) As a public health nurse, Stephanie Pizzey knows better than most how COVID-19 vaccines work and how they were developed, and encourages people to take them when offered. But Pizzey, who is 26 weeks pregnant, isn't getting immunized yet on the advice of her doctor. "Initially, I was quite comfortable with getting it because I work a lot with vaccines," said Pizzey. "With this one — it's a little tricky because it hasn't been researched thoroughly in pregnancy or breastfeeding women." Clinical trials for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna — the two types of vaccine available to Canadians — didn't include pregnant or breastfeeding people. While the vaccine was approved for use in other adults, there's not yet conclusive research about the safety and efficacy of the vaccines for either the mother or fetus. Pfizer announced this month that it has started a global clinical trial to test the vaccine for pregnant people, and a dozen women who got the vaccine during its wider trial and later got pregnant are being monitored, with no adverse effects reported so far. But simply opting to wait for research conclusions poses a dilemma for health-care workers like Pizzey. Red Deer registered nurse Stephanie Pizzey is 26 weeks pregnant. Evidence collected in Canada and internationally shows that pregnant people who get COVID-19 are at greater risk of more severe outcomes from the illness. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada recommends pregnant and breastfeeding women be offered the vaccine, as long as no contraindications exist. "This decision is based on the women's personal values and an understanding that the risk of infection and/or morbidity from COVID-19 outweighs the theorized and undescribed risk of being vaccinated during pregnancy or while breastfeeding," the society's statement reads. It remains unclear when vaccine will be made widely available to Albertans. But for now, pregnant health-care workers have to weigh the risks and make their own decisions. In addition to her job with public health, Pizzey sometimes works in the Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre's neonatal intensive care unit. She said if she spent more time in the hospital or working in a setting with a higher likelihood of COVID-19 positive cases, she would likely get the shots. "It's still something that does weigh heavily on my mind," she said, adding that she's open to changing her mind if her doctor's advice changes, or if the obstetrician she is scheduled to meet with soon thinks she should get it now. 'Don't have to rely on other people' Calgary recreation therapist Emily Chell is at the beginning of the third trimester of her pregnancy and plans to get the vaccine. She works on a neuro-rehabilitation unit in a Calgary hospital, with patients who have suffered strokes, and brain and spinal cord injuries. She said she didn't think she would be allowed to get the vaccine until an email inviting her to sign up landed in her inbox in January. She spoke to a friend who is a gynecological surgeon in another province who told her it was her choice. "I was excited, I was stoked," she said. "I waited and talked to my doctor, and she basically backed that up. She said . . . 'if you want to get it, get it.'" Calgary hospital-based recreation therapist Emily Chell is in the third trimester of her pregnancy.She said she researched mRna vaccines, and that made her feel more comfortable. "So for me, the risk sounds very low. The more I looked into it, the more I read about it, the less anxious I was, for sure." Chell has had a couple instances of close contacts to positive COVID-19 cases at work. Though she feels safe at work using PPE, physical distancing and other safety measures, she said, the biggest motivator for her was being able to take some control over protection against the virus. "Knowing that I can get the shot myself and protect myself, and don't have to rely on other people was huge," she said. Chell's appointment was cancelled when the province ran short on its supply of doses, and she hasn't been able to get another appointment booked yet. A shared discussion Pregnant people should weigh the likelihood of being exposed to COVID-19 and talk to their doctors, said Dr. Sue Chandra, a maternal fetal specialist and associate professor at University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine. "In the end it always comes down to the patient's autonomy," said Chandra, who sees patients at the Lois Hole Hospital for Women in Edmonton. "Our job as providers is to give them the best information so they can use that to guide their decision-making," Dr. Sue Chandra is a maternal fetal specialist at the Lois Hole Hospital for Women and an associate professor at University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine. She said the initial exclusion of pregnant and breastfeeding people from clinical trials — a longstanding concern in health research — puts practitioners in a challenging position. "One of the considerations and challenges for us as prenatal providers is that we can't necessarily support the fact that administering this vaccine has been safe for pregnant women or even effective in terms of how much immunity it will convey compared to the effectiveness of the people in the trials," she said. But Chandra said that while most pregnant people won't suffer from severe outcomes if they get COVID-19, they are at a higher risk for ending up in hospital or in intensive care than other people of the same age. She said observation during the pandemic has shown that pregnant people who are over 35, overweight, or who have underlying health conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes or pre-existing heart and lung problems are more at risk of severe outcomes. As for risk to a fetus, Chandra said current information indicates the risk of a COVID-19 positive mother transmitting the virus to the baby is very low, and so far there is no evidence of a correlation with birth defects. However, she said COVID-19 does seem to increase the risk obstetrical complications, including increased risk of pre-term births and potential fetal growth restriction. She said factors a pregnant person should consider as they weigh their decision on getting vaccinated include: Rates of COVID-19 infection in their community; Their personal likelihood of exposure (Do they work from home? With the public? In health care?); And other risk factors for pregnant people, including age, weight and underlying health conditions. Chandra said it should be a shared discussion between a pregnant person their health-care provider. Canadian research into COVID-19 and pregnancy As of Feb. 17, Alberta had reported 898 cases of COVID-19 in pregnant women, according to the Canadian COVID-19 In Pregnancy Surveillance (CANCOVID-Preg), an ongoing initiative led by University of British Columbia researcher Dr. Deborah Money. In a report compiling information from five provinces, the researchers made "crude" calculations of the rate at which pregnant people had contracted COVID-19, and as of Nov. 30, 2020, Alberta had reported the highest rate of COVID-19 infections per 1,000 pregnant individuals: 10.8 - Alberta 6.4 - British Columbia 6.4 Manitoba 6 - Ontario 9.1 - Quebec However, a spokesperson for the program noted that underreporting of COVID-19 among pregnant people in other provinces could be behind a seemingly increased infection rate in Alberta. She said updated data will be released in the next several days.

Pregnant health-care workers weigh COVID-19 vaccine risks given lack of research

The Philippines and Argentina have become the latest countries to approve Chinese-developed COVID-19 vaccines for emergency use.

Philippines, Argentina approve Chinese vaccines - Chinadaily.com.cn

Argentina on Sunday approved the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Chinese company Sinopharm for emergency use.

Argentina approves Sinopharm COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan has begun administering a COVID-19 vaccine with a ceremony at the presidential palace.KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghanistan has begun administering a COVID-19 vaccine with a ceremony at the presidential palace.

The Latest: Afghanistan begins vaccination drive | National News | oskaloosa.com

Doctors are seeing several women coming in for mammograms with the same issue and it's causing concern. The patients have swollen lymph nodes, which is a rare sign of breast cancer.Doctors are seeing several women coming in for mammograms with the same issue and it's causing concern. The patients have swollen lymph nodes, which is a rare sign of breast cancer.

COVID-19 vaccine could cause mammogram result confusion, doctors say | abc7.com

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) reported 716 more positive coronavirus cases and announced 44 additional confirmed COVID-19 deaths Tuesday. The latest ISDH dashboard data indicates the state’s 7-day all-test positivity rate of 4.1%, with a cumulative rate of 10% positive. Since the start of the pandemic, ISDH has reported 657,037 total […]INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) reported 716 more positive coronavirus cases and announced 44 additional confirmed COVID-19 deaths Tuesday. The latest ISDH dashboard da…

716 new coronavirus cases, 44 additional deaths reported by ISDH | WTTV CBS4Indy

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona surpassed 105,000 on Tuesday, July 7, and the number of deaths attributed to COVID-19 was 117.Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona surpassed 105,000 on Tuesday, July 7, and the number of deaths attributed to COVID-19 was 117.

COVID-19 cases in Arizona have plunged 71% in February | AZ Big Media

Officials said that India has inoculated at least 1.17 crore people — 1.04 crore have been administered first dose and 12.61 lakh second dose — across the country.Officials said that India has inoculated at least 1.17 crore people — 1.04 crore have been administered first dose and 12.61 lakh second dose — across the country.

India's Covid-19 positivity rate declining, trend of less deaths seen: Govt | Hindustan Times

There is urgency to get Hawaii COVID-vaccinated, but the rollout has stirred many questions. The optimal link to access vaccination info and sign up (currently by appointment only for health-care, frontline and essential workers, those in long-term care facilites and seniors age 75 and up): hawaiicovid19.com/vaccine.

How and when to get vaccinated for coronavirus in Hawaii | Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Even as America passes a horrifying milestone — 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19 — large swaths of the country are starting a new week with some very positive signs.Even as America passes a horrifying milestone — 500,000 lives lost to COVID-19 — large swaths of the country are starting a new week with some very positive signs.

States ramp up reopening plans as vaccine supply increases | WATE 6 On Your Side

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley is apologizing for turning away two people eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations on Saturday because they could notThe University of Texas Rio Grande Valley is apologizing for turning away two people eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations on Saturday because they could not

Texas Vaccination Site Apologizes For Refusing COVID-19 Shots To Two Eligible People | KNAU Arizona Public Radio

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island on Monday started allowing residents age 65 and...PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island on Monday started allowing residents age 65 and...

Rhode Island expands eligibility for COVID-19 vaccinations

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Three community coronavirus vaccination locations in Rhode...PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Three community coronavirus vaccination locations in Rhode...

Rhode Island vaccine deliveries delayed by weather

Health: Over 43 million doses of Sinopharm's Covid-19 vaccines used globally-state media

Amanda Kloots was surprised at the hate she received over the weekend after sharing on social media that she had received the first dose of the coronavirus vaccination, she said Monday on "The Talk."Amanda Kloots was surprised at the hate she received over the weekend after sharing on social media that she had received the first dose of the coronavirus vaccination, she said Monday on "The Talk."

Amanda Kloots addresses criticism about her receiving COVID-19 vaccine: ‘Boggles my mind’

This comes as vaccine shipments delayed by last week's storm are expected to arrive Monday.

New York City Receives Needed COVID Vaccine Shipment, As Restrictions Ease This Week

Women who have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine may want to wait until after their second shot to get a mammogram.Women who have gotten the COVID-19 vaccine may want to wait until after their second shot to get a mammogram.

Recently vaccinated women should wait to get mammograms, doctors advise - The Virginian-Pilot

BATON ROUGE, La. (WDSU) — The Louisiana Department of Health has announced vaccine distributions for the week of Feb. 22. Nearly half a million more people in Louisiana are now eligible for the vaccine. Among the people who can get a vaccine now include teachers, daycare workers and pregnant women. The age range was also […]BATON ROUGE, La. (WDSU) — The Louisiana Department of Health has announced vaccine distributions for the week of Feb. 22. Nearly half a million more people in Louisiana are now eligible for the vac…

BRPROUD/LDH: 501 vaccine providers across state will receive COVID-19 vaccine this week

CITY News. Arts. Life.

Reports of some patients developing swollen lymph nodes after a COVID-19 vaccination has raised questions about whether screening mammograms should be rescheduled due to concerns that this finding could beReports of some patients developing swollen lymph nodes after a COVID-19 vaccination has raised questions about whether screening mammograms should be rescheduled due to concerns that this finding could be

Screening mammograms and COVID-19 vaccine | Lifestyles | tylerpaper.com

How do we know the COVID-19 vaccines are safe? Scientists look for safety issues during the testing phase and continue their monitoring as shots roll out around the world.How do we know the COVID-19 vaccines are safe? Scientists look for safety issues during the testing phase and continue their monitoring as shots roll out around the world.

How do we know the COVID-19 vaccines are safe? - Vancouver Is Awesome

PLoS One. 2021 Feb 22;16(2):e0247409. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0247409. eCollection 2021.ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: Gender disparities exist in the scale-up andPLoS One. 2021 Feb 22;16(2):e0247409. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0247409. eCollection 2021.ABSTRACTBACKGROUND: Gender disparities exist in the scale-up and uptake of HIV services with men being disproportionately under-represented in the services. In Eastern and Southern Africa, of the people living with HIV infection, more adult women than men were on treatment highlighting the disparities in HIV services. Delayed…

"Dispense antiretrovirals daily!" restructuring the delivery of HIV services to optimize antiretroviral initiation among men in Malawi - Docwire News

Fully vaccinated people can now skip quarantine even if they've been exposed to Covid-19, according to new guidelines from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But at the same time, the agency also acknowledges there's a lot researchers don't know about how vaccines impact transmission.Fully vaccinated people can now skip quarantine even if they've been exposed to Covid-19, according to new guidelines from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But at the same time, the agency also acknowledges there's a lot researchers don't know about how vaccines impact transmission.

Confused by guidelines on quarantine after vaccination? You're not alone :: WRAL.com

The United States has administered 61,289,500 doses of COVID-19 vaccines as of Saturday morning and delivered 79,128,495 doses, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.The United States has administered 61,289,500 doses of COVID-19 vaccines as of Saturday morning and delivered 79,128,495 doses, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

U.S. administers 61.3 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines: CDC | Reuters

Deadline Detroit | Wayne County Opens Senior Covid Vaccine Centers This Week

Governor Cuomo updated New Yorkers on the state's vaccination program.

Governor Cuomo Updates New Yorkers on State Vaccination Program | Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

New York City had fewer than 1,000 first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine on-hand Saturday, data from the City's website showed.The City gets its supply from the State which says their shipments were delayed this week due to the winter storms impacting much of the country.

COVID NYC Update: City has fewer than 1,000 first doses of COVID-19 vaccine as 2 new sites open for appointments | abc7ny.com

CDC vaccine quarantine update: Do you have to quarantine if you've been fully vaccinated? Here's the latest CDC vaccine guidelines and infoSome fully vaccinated people can avoid a two-week quarantine after possible exposure to COVID-19. The CDC lays out three criteria.

CDC vaccinated no quarantine: Latest guidelines, 2021 fact check | fox61.com

A shipment to Florida of more than 200,000 doses of Moderna vaccine has been delayed due to a storm that has battered parts of the country, and the state’s top emergency management official doesn’t know when the coveted COVID-19 vaccine is expected to arrive. “This delay could go on for several more days, we don’t have an answer on when it’s going to arrive,” Division of Emergency Management Director Jarod Moskowitz told The News Service of Florida on Tuesday afternoon.A shipment to Florida of more than 200,000 doses of Moderna vaccine has been delayed due to a storm that has battered parts of the country, and the state’s top emergency management official doesn’t know when the coveted COVID-19 vaccine is expected to arrive. “This delay could go on for several more days, we don’t have an answer on when it’s going to arrive,” Division of Emergency Management Director Jarod Moskowitz told The News Service of Florida on Tuesday afternoon.

Storm delays COVID-19 vaccine delivery | WPEC

Storm delays COVID-19 vaccine delivery

NEW YORK -- Efforts to vaccinate Americans against COVID-19 have been stymied by a series of winter storms and outages that have hobbled transportation hubs and highways.NEW YORK -- Efforts to vaccinate Americans against COVID-19 have been stymied by a series of winter storms and outages that have hobbled transportation hubs and highways.

How have storms affected COVID-19 vaccinations? | US | The Journal Gazette

A City Hall spokeswoman said distribution delays had left New York bereft of the lifesaving injections.A City Hall spokeswoman said distribution delays had left New York bereft of the lifesaving injections.

NYC has just 1,000 first doses of COVID vaccine on hand - New York Daily News

Fully vaccinated people can now skip quarantine even if they’ve been exposed to Covid-19, according to new guidelines from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But at the same time, the agency also acknowledges there’s a lot researchers don’t know about how vaccines impact transmission. The new guidance only applies if it has

Confused by guidelines on quarantine after vaccination? You're not alone - KVIA

In total, the agency said 69,883,625 doses have been delivered and 50,641,884 doses have been administered so far.The U.S. hit a milestone Saturday in the push to get Americans vaccinated for COVID-19. The Biden administration has pledged to ramp up daily doses to 1.5 million.

CDC: 50 million COVID-19 vaccine doses administered in US | 13wmaz.com

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had administered over 50 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines in the country as of Saturday morning and delivered about 69.9 million doses.The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had administered over 50 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines in the country as of Saturday morning and delivered about 69.9 million doses.

Over 50 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines administered in America —US CDC